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  • clarehiler 9:34 pm on May 10, 2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Calvert Collins, Casey nolen, Ed Forbes, Elise hu, , flickr, foursquare, gowalla, , , Kevin Lewis, Kris ketz, prezi, social media, , , , , upstream, Whitney Mathews, wordpress   

    anewguide: Final Guidelines 

    After months of research, and dozens of interviews with journalists and non journalists, we have created our new guide to social media. The following is our 10 guidelines for how newsrooms around the country, on all platforms, should, and should not, use social media. 

    For our full presentation click here

    GUIDELINES

     #1 PROFESSIONAL VS. PERSONAL

    • Understand that your professional obligations as a journalist extend online.
    • However, at the end of the day, people do appreciate a person that can relate to in person as well as on the web.
    • Here’s what two journalists has to say about this topic:

    “I don’t say anything on Twitter or Facebook that I wouldn’t say on the air.”

    “At the end of the day I’m a normal human being and if there is a picture of me at a bar what’s the big deal. Normal people drink. That said, you are not going to find pictures of me doing keg stands. In my opinion, it’s about finding that happy medium and making sure you stay there.”

    #2 KNOW YOUR TOOLS

    • Each story can we enhanced through social media tools.
    • However, since each story is different, different tools should be used.
    • For example, in breaking news situations tweeting pictures and videos is the fastest way to get information out. However, for longer term stories, interaction through Facebook polls, Flickr and storify can better enhance a story.
    • Here are some tools we like:

    #3 BEST CONSISTENT AND RELIABLE

    • Just as a journalist would on any platform, they need to follow through with what they promise through social media (ex. updates).

    “Just like your audience members can rely on you when on the air, they should be able to rely on your tweets for information”

    #4 CONVERSATION IS KEY

    • When you use social media, make sure that it encourages people to respond. You can do this by using inciting questions.
    • When people do respond, make sure you answer. This is true whether the response is negative or positive.

    “I would remember the most important rule in social networking, you get what you give… News organizations need to communicate authentically, as human beings, which means replying to questions and complains, retreating and linking out to other content producer’s stories…”

    “Reaching out to our viewers can open the communication from one way to ways.”

    #5 EXPLORE NEW TOOLS

    • Social media is always changing and as journalists, we need to adapt.
    • Be willing to try new sites and projects, because you don’t want to be left behind.”

    “I do location based SM with Gowalla (it’s an Austin  based company so I prefer it to FourSquare). I also have a Tumblr page for my Instagram photos, and YouTube and Vimeo channels.”

    #6 ETHICS

    • The same standards journalists have in a newsroom, apply online too.
    • Newsrooms should have policies in place regarding:
      • Retracting tweets
      • Deleting tweets
      • Only tweeting what you know
      • Remember it’s better to be third than wrong.

    #7 BE TRANSPARENT

    • You audience likes to know how you got your information, and what you did to get it.
    • Give them a behind the scenes view of your story, in the end this will give them a closer relationship to you.
    • In breaking news situations this is especially true.

    “As soon as I get assigned a story, I tweet where I am going. As the story develops, I will tweet and post updates to the 8 News Now Fan Page. I try to post any pictures and videos as possible.”

    #8 LISTEN TO YOUR VIEWERS

    • If you viewers have a problem with how you are using social media, or if they have newsworthy information, it’s important to listen.
    • Social media is a 2 way conversation.

    “As soon as I get to work to let people know I am active online if they need to tell me anything.”

    #9 DON’T WASTE YOUR AUDIENCE’S TIME

    • People don’t appreciate when organizations over flood their feeds. Social media is a tool that allows people to filter what they want to consume, so if you waste their time, it is easy to unfollow your organization.
    • When asked what makes you “follow” or “like” something, this non journalist answered…

    “I’m not. I’m a fan of maybe two things on Facebook because the updates and announcements are annoying. I like to decide when I read my news, not be bombarded with it.”

    “For me, Twitter is a no-nonsense medium. I want to make each tweet something of value, news value usually, for my followers. Facebook is more of me trying to shape my online identity. It’s the homepage I was always going to create and never did.”

    #10 TIMING IS EVERYTHING

    • Understand that people are active on different platforms during different times of the day.
      • Blogging is most active in the morning.
      • Facebook is most active during off work hours.
      • Twitter is unique, but you can use the tool Tweroid to determine when your followers are on.

    TIPS FOR LAUNCHING SOCIAL MEDIA

                “Were I to do it again, I’d push both mediums simultaneously [Facebook and Twitter]. We were late to the Facebook game. I’d recommend that newsrooms start hammering on both mediums at once. Cross promotion helps, we’ve found.”

    – Ed Forbes, The Journal News (@edforbes)

    “New stations, I would recomend any one in my industry to get online as soon as possible. Sit back and follow people to see what they like or don’t like if you’re not comfortable on the platform. Don’t watch too long, you’ll want to start interacting as soon as you can. Also, ask for help or advice from viewers followers. People in the Twitter world love teaching you how to be great.”

    FINAL TIPS

    • Create lists of your followers and sources.
    • Follow everyone that follows you.
    • Do not overwhelm your followers.
    • Incorporate it into your broadcasts
      • Mention you Facebook on your morning show.
     
    • billbennettnz 4:32 am on May 11, 2011 Permalink | Reply

      This is great stuff. The one tip I’d highlight (you cover it in tip #4) is NOT to use Twitter or any other social media as a broadcast only medium.

  • clarehiler 4:27 am on April 27, 2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: FOX, social media,   

    Check out how one FOX station is using social media in their 4:00 PM show.

    http://www.ctnow.com/news/4pm/

     
  • aeholley 7:47 pm on April 20, 2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Homepage, , social media,   

    Twitter Homepage Gets Another Makeover 

    The Twitter homepage got another makeover!

    Here’s a Huffington Post article on the new look:  New Twitter Homepage Launches–Again

     
  • clarehiler 4:46 pm on April 20, 2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , social media   

    Original Research: Are Journalists Not Doing Enough? 

    As a part of our original research we have surveyed non-journalists about their social media use. We asked those surveyed, what would make them use social media more? Overwhelmingly they answered, “if I was getting better information.”
    What does this say about how we as journalists are using social media? Are we not putting enough content online? Are our social media skills not sharp enough to engage our viewers and readers?

    What do you think?

     
  • clarehiler 8:10 pm on April 15, 2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , social media,   

    Here is a part of an article discussing the differences in Social Media users from Social Media Today.
    Check out the full article here: http://bit.ly/gsSj1l

    FACEBOOK – Don’t Hate Them Because They’re Beautiful

    Facebook has remained at an estimated unique visitor count of 590 million for in the last two quarters. This has caused some Social Media naysayers to proclaim that Social Media is dead. It’s amusing and sad at the same time. It’s like a used car salesman saying that new car sales are dead because they’ve leveled off for two quarters.

    Facebook is and will continue to be the way that individuals communicate, inform, and influence others for the foreseeable future. A more reasonable growth during 2011 should be anticipated with Facebook ending 2011, around 610 to 625 million.

    The return of female users on Facebook continues. I say ‘return’ because female users were at 60% at the end of the 1st quarter of 2010 and dipped in the middle of the year. The percentage of women users stood at 57% the end of the 3rd quarter 2010, 59% at the end of the 4th quarter, and is now at 61%.

    There has been no significant change in the age groups using Facebook during the last three quarters. This would indicate that Facebook users are becoming more defined. Seventy-two percent of users are between 25 and 54, and dividing those into ten-year spans (25-34, 35-44, and 45-55) results in near equal distribution among the three age groups.

    CONCLUSION: Facebook is used primarily by adults of both sexes, but significantly female, in the prime of their active professional careers for social interaction.

    TWITTER – The Scoop on Real-Time Events and Discussion

    Media ‘Experts’ continue to try to figure out how to ‘monetize’ Twitter and come away with programs that annoy people and are rejected by Tweeters. When they offer dismal ROI (return on investment) figures to their client they shrug their shoulders and declare Twitter is a fad and useless. Then a major world event happens and Twitter becomes the most important information tool on the planet.

    Twitter is an acid test on whether a person ‘gets’ Social Media or not, because it is one of the most powerful Social Media tools on the web, but it is not a space for advertising or marketing. This makes Twitter one of the most envied and hated Social Media tools by traditional marketing and media people, but one of the most loved by those who are believers.

    Twitter has been hanging just under 100 million unique users per month since the 2nd quarter of 2010, but did dip down to 89 million at the end of 2010. Since then Twitter has jumped back up to finish the 1st quarter of 2011 at 97 million. The jump in the 1st quarter of this year is likely due to the world political events in north Africa and the earthquake and tsunami in Nippon.

    Women use Twitter more than men, but like Facebook, there was a dip in the middle of 2010, when female users dropped from 60% at the end of the 1st quarter. By the end of the 4th quarter female users were at 55% and that has grown to 57% at the end of 2011’s 1st quarter.

    Age demographics for Twitter also haven’t changed significantly during the last three quarters. Twitter users skew towards the young professional age group with 54% of the users falling in the 25-44 age group. At the end of the 1st quarter of 2011, only 18% of the users fell in the 45-54 age range compared to 26% of Facebook users.

    CONCLUSION: Twitter is used primarily by young professionals of both sexes, but significantly female, to discuss current, real-time issues including world events and business-related topics

     
  • clarehiler 2:41 pm on April 13, 2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , social media,   

    Why Social Media Reinvigorates the Market for Quality Journalism
    Read the full article here: http://mashable.com/2011/04/12/social-journalism-quality/

    Social media has created a human filter for quality content. The social web, like the old water cooler, favors conversations around news and even in-depth journalism that may not otherwise receive the exposure it deserves. Recent analysis of the most-tweeted stories from The Daily iPad app revealed that users shared more hard news stories over gossip and opinion pieces.

    This doesn’t necessarily mean these are the stories most people are reading. The gossip articles (or “fluff” pieces) often out-perform news items in pageviews, often because that is what people are searching for. But the tide may be changing.

    The incentive to share quality content is simple: A person may be more likely to read gossip, but they may share a news piece to shape their followers’ perception of them. They may even view it as a public service. I tend to believe it’s usually the former rather than the more altruistic latter. As a result, news organizations producing quality journalism are being rewarded with accelerated growth in social referral traffic — in some cases, growing at a much faster pace than search referrals. More notably, social media is enabling the citizenry to be active participants in producing journalism by giving them platforms to publish to the social audience. This has made journalism more efficient and, in many ways, enhanced the quality of storytelling.

    Searching for Quality

    The social filter for content has been around for a long time on the web, but prior to social media sites like Facebook and Twitter, it was conducted more privately via email messages or impersonal recommendations from a search algorithm.

    The public perception was a non-factor, and users were more likely to share softer stories or those based on utility. There was a trust factor between the sharer and the recipient. Before, you were just sharing that funny cat video with your trusted circle. With social media, that circle has now become more of an open field.

    So what about search? Search engines like Google fueled an explosion of “so-so” content, but it has also fueled an explosion of quality content, said Danny Sullivan, editor of Search Engine Land. The idea was that quality content would get linked to most. But when media organizations and writers began to better understand how the search algorithms ranked content, they started to create content “optimized” for search results by inter-linking content on their sites or monitoring search trends and filling the coverage with sub-par content to capitalize on search traffic, Sullivan said. And so we saw the explosion of content farms and a race for unique visitors to appease the advertising gods.

    The Human Quality Vote

    For true quality, sometimes it takes a human touch. Social media acts as a human filter and signal for the best content across the web. A “Like,” a tweet or a LinkedIn share often serves as a human vote of approval. “We have depended far too long on looking at links as an idea of what people are voting on,” Sullivan said.

    But links have been devalued over time because they have been sold, he added. For search algorithms, a link is a key component of where the piece of content ranks in search results. But because people began to sell links, they became less valuable over time, Sullivan said.

    He said social links and shares are more trusted because the structure of social networks provides an easy way to recommend content to a network. That network consists of people you trust and are more likely to click on a link shared by a friend than a stranger. However, because these recommendations are more public than before, there’s an incentive to recommend quality content.

    A More Valuable Reader?

    It’s not easy to compare social to search because the behaviors and demands from a user are completely different. A user goes to search with an immediate need to find a specific piece of information and discovery is secondary. With social sites, users are consuming content in a leisurely and social state. Discovery takes the front seat.

    This may explain the difference between referral traffic from search vs. social. In a recent analysis of Mashable‘s social and traffic data, I found that Facebook and Twitter visitors spent 29% more time on Mashable.com and viewed 20% more pages than visitors arriving via search engines. This may suggest a more engaged or exploratory reader, at least in terms of how much time they spend reading the content.

    At The Washington Post and other media organizations (including Mashable), referral traffic from social sites — particularly Facebook and Twitter — are outpacing the growth of referrals from search, said Raju Narisetti, managing editor at the Post. Though Narisetti wouldn’t quantify the growth, he noted that on a given day, 5% to 8% of referral traffic to the Post comes from social media.

    So what kind of content is bringing them to the Post? Breaking news, quality analysis, offbeat features and quality photo galleries and videos. Similar to search, social presents challenges in attracting an audience. Factors such as the time of day and frequency of distribution on a social channel can affect how successful the Post is in engaging readers, Narisetti said. But the Post hasn’t had to change its content strategy to attract more social referrals.

    “While we have aggressive goals for our social team, the goals are based off [the] Post‘s unique content rather than trying to rethink our content to get more social referrals,” Narisetti said. Instead, the Post is focusing on making it easy for social media users to interact with content via Network News and other integrations.

    Social Media Optimization

    From linking standards to meta tags, news organizations have been working for years to improve their content’s search engine optimization (SEO). Now we’re seeing the rise of social media optimization. Sree Sreenivasan, dean of student affairs at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism, said news organizations will need to get into the “SMO game.” But that doesn’t mean gaming the system. “They should look for ways to make their content more social to take advantage of the new ways in which readers, viewers, [and] consumers think,” Sreenivasan said.

    This means, among other things, providing easy ways to engage content using social media and having reporters take part in conversations on the social web. It means having the entire organization think in “social terms” — not just broadcasting materials out, but participating in the social ecosystem.

    In many ways, social media makes it harder to “game” for the purpose of simply driving lots of traffic to a story that may not be of high quality. Social media’s effect on quality isn’t quite as systematic as search has been. Mathilde Piard, social media manager at Cox Media digital, said social media is having a positive effect on content.

    “I’d rather editorial decisions be driven by what editors and reporters think people will read and be moved to share, rather than by keywords,” Piard said. With the latter, she said, you end up with content such as, “What Time Does the Superbowl Start At?”

    Social Search

    The tide may turn with developments like Google’s recent updates to its algorithm, which favors original reporting, and its recent launch of +1. The +1 product adds a social recommendation layer across Google Search results.

    When you’re searching for a specific piece of content, you can see the results that your friends have recommended. The integration brings the social filter into search, while staying true to Google’s core product: search. It also creates a social identity for users. After all, what you recommend using +1 can be seen on your Google Profile.

    Though +1 isn’t a social network, it is certainly a big step toward building one. But perhaps most important is its implications for quality. The number of +1s on a story link affects its placement in search results.

    This essentially applies the social incentive to share or recommend quality content to search results and gives Google a good potential footing in remaining the dominant referrer to content sites.

    Social Content

    Content creation is one of the missing links and perhaps the cosmic difference between search and social. Search points to content that has been made, while social enables users to create content on the platform itself. How the two affect the quality of journalism are fundamentally different. Sure, social does a big amount of pointing itself, which enables news sites to grab referred traffic. But the people formerly known as the audience are also creating videos, status updates, tweets, photos and more.

    “Curation helps cut through that noise to find the most relevant voice, amplifying the media that helps inform and enlighten.”

    • Burt Herman, Storify

    Burt Herman knows this all too well. It’s the reason why he launched Storify, a site that enables you to easily curate social content into one contextualized story. Herman said that social media improves the quality of content because it is content.

    Social media has revolutionized content creation, which is now a collaborative process with readers who contribute and verify it. Though social media makes content publishing easy for everyone, it can also be overwhelming, Herman said.

    “Curation helps cut through that noise to find the most relevant voice, amplifying the media that helps inform and enlighten,” he said.

    Journalists have always “curated” content by grabbing pieces of information and contextualizing it into a story. The difference is that social media now provides efficiency in getting that information, often through first-hand sources who are micropublishing to their social profiles. This social journalism has spawned other content curation companies like Storyful, Curated.by and ScribbleLive.

    “We now have many more voices who can be included in stories,” Herman said. “This means that what we read is richer and gives more information to the reader.”

     
  • clarehiler 5:26 pm on April 12, 2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Infographic, , social media   

    Here is a new inforgraphic showing the current “winners” and “losers” of social media. It’s a good indicator of what newsrooms should be investing their time into.

    Check out the full article here: http://mashable.com/2011/04/12/social-networks-infographic/

     
  • clarehiler 11:57 pm on April 11, 2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , RTDNA, social media   

    We have been researching social media ethics a lot lately, and talking about it on this blog. While we’ve been on the subject, we thought it was a good time to post some social media guidelines. Here are some from RTDNA. Comment if you have another source of guidelines.

    Ethics
    Social Media and Blogging Guidelines
    Social media and blogs are important elements of journalism. They narrow the distance between journalists and the public. They encourage lively, immediate and spirited discussion. They can be vital news-gathering and news-delivery tools. As a journalist you should uphold the same professional and ethical standards of fairness, accuracy, truthfulness, transparency and independence when using social media as you do on air and on all digital news platforms.

    Truth and Fairness

    • Social media comments and postings should meet the same standards of fairness, accuracy and attribution that you apply to your on-air or digital platforms.

    •Information gleaned online should be confirmed just as you must confirm scanner traffic or phone tips before reporting them. If you cannot independently confirm critical information, reveal your sources; tell the public how you know what you know and what you cannot confirm. Don’t stop there. Keep seeking confirmation. This guideline is the same for covering breaking news on station websites as on the air. You should not leave the public “hanging.” Lead the public to completeness and understanding.

    • Twitter’s character limits and immediacy are not excuses for inaccuracy and unfairness.

    •Remember that social media postings live on as online archives. Correct and clarify mistakes, whether they are factual mistakes or mistakes of omission.

    •When using content from blogs or social media, ask critical questions such as:

    • What is the source of the video or photograph? Who wrote the comment and what was the motivation for posting it.
    • Does the source have the legal right to the material posted? Did that person take the photograph or capture the video?
    • Has the photograph or video been manipulated? Have we checked to see if the metadata attached to the image reveals that it has been altered?

    • Social networks typically offer a “privacy” setting, so users can choose not to have their photographs or thoughts in front of the uninvited public. Capturing material from a public Facebook site is different from prying behind a password-protected wall posing as a friend. When considering whether to access “private” content, journalists should apply the same RTDNA guidelines recommended for undercover journalism. Ask:

    • Does the poster have a ‘reasonable expectation’ of privacy?
    • Is this a story of great significance?
    • Is there any other way to get the information?
    • Are you willing to disclose your methods and reasoning?
    • What are your journalistic motivations?

    For Discussion in your Newsroom:
    1. When an Army psychiatrist killed 13 people at Fort Hood, Twitter messages, supposedly from “inside the post” reported gunfire continued for a half hour and that there were multiple shooters. Journalists passed along the information naming Twitter writers as the sources. The information proved to be false and needed to be corrected. If one or multiple shooters had been at large, withholding that information could have caused some people to be in harm’s way. The nature of live, breaking news frequently leads to reports of rumor, hearsay and other inaccurate information. Journalists must source information, correct mistakes quickly and prominently and remind the public that the information is fluid and could be unreliable.

    Questions for the Newsroom:

    • What protocols does your newsroom have to correct mistakes on social media sites such as Twitter and Facebook?
    • Does your newsroom have a process for copyediting and oversight of the content posted on social media sites? What decision-making process do you go through before you post?
    • What protocols do you have for checking the truthfulness of photographs or video that you find on Facebook, YouTube or photo-sharing sites? Have you contacted the photographer? Can you see the unedited video or raw photograph file? Does the image or video make sense when compared to the facts of the story?
    • Who in the newsroom is charged with confirming information gleaned from social media sites?

    Accountability and Transparency

    • You should not write anonymously or use an avatar or username that cloaks your real identity on newsroom or personal websites. You are responsible for everything you say. Commenting or blogging anonymously compromises this core principle.

    • Be especially careful when you are writing, Tweeting or blogging about a topic that you or your newsroom covers. Editorializing about a topic or person can reveal your personal feelings. Biased comments could be used in a court of law to demonstrate a predisposition, or even malicious intent, in a libel action against the news organization, even for an unrelated story.

    • Just as you keep distance between your station’s advertising and journalism divisions, you should not use social media to promote business or personal interests without disclosing that relationship to the public. Sponsored links should be clearly labeled, not cloaked as journalistic content.

    For Discussion in your Newsroom:
    1. Your consumer reporter at a major electronics show wants to give a glowing blog review of a new digital camera. When the company makes the splashy announcement, the reporter Tweets the news. The message virals fast and wide. Your station will be running ads for the camera as part of the company’s national advertising campaign. How will you tell the public that you have a business relationship with the camera company?

    2. Your political reporter has been covering the challenger in the mayor’s race. On his personal Facebook page, your reporter says, “I am covering another candidate who is dumber than dirt.” The candidate’s press secretary calls to demand that the political reporter be “taken off the campaign.” Your reporter’s defense: “What I say on my own time on my own website is my business. Plus I didn’t name names.”

    How will you respond? What should you tell the public about the complaint and your decision?

    Image and Reputation

    • Remember that what’s posted online is open to the public (even if you consider it to be private). Personal and professional lives merge online. Newsroom employees should recognize that even though their comments may seem to be in their “private space,” their words become direct extensions of their news organizations. Search engines and social mapping sites can locate their posts and link the writers’ names to their employers.

    • There are journalistic reasons to connect with people online, even if you cover them, but consider whom you “friend” on sites like Facebook or “follow” on Twitter. You may believe that online “friends” are different from other friends in your life, but the public may not always see it that way. For example, be prepared to publicly explain why you show up as a “friend” on a politician’s website. Inspect your “friends” list regularly to look for conflicts with those who become newsmakers.

    • Be especially careful when registering for social network sites. Pay attention to how the public may interpret Facebook information that describes your relationship status, age, sexual preference and political or religious views. These descriptors can hold loaded meanings and affect viewer perception.

    • Keep in mind that when you join an online group, the public may perceive that you support that group. Be prepared to justify your membership.

    • Avoid posting photos or any other content on any website, blog, social network or video/photo sharing website that might embarrass you or undermine your journalistic credibility. Keep this in mind, even if you are posting on what you believe to be a “private” or password-protected site. Consider this when allowing others to take pictures of you at social gatherings. When you work for a journalism organization, you represent that organization on and off the clock. The same standards apply for journalists who work on air or off air.

    • Bloggers and journalists who use social media often engage readers in a lively give-and-take of ideas. Never insult or disparage readers. Try to create a respectful, informed dialogue while avoiding personal attacks.

    For Discussion in your Newsroom:
    1. Edgy Facebook and Twitter postings create more traffic, so you urge your newsroom to get online and be provocative to get more attention. How will you respond when your anchor poses holding a half-empty martini glass on her Facebook site? How will you respond if your reporter’s Facebook profile picture shows a bong in the background? What would your response be if a producer, who identifies herself as “conservative” on her Facebook page, Tweets her opinions during a political rally?

    2. A news manager “friends” a neighbor he meets at a block party. A year later the neighbor decides to run for mayor. The news manager gets an indignant call from the incumbent mayor’s press secretary suggesting the station coverage will be biased, since your news manager supports the challenger. Does the news manager have to “unfriend” his neighbor to preserve the appearance of fairness? Could the manager make things right if he “friended” the mayor, too?

    RTDNF provides workshops and programs on ethics, leadership and decision-making skills and a number of other guidelines for specific journalistic challenges. In addition, RTDNA staff members and board members are always available to provide assistance upon request.

    These guidelines were developed by the RTDNA Ethics Committee and Al Tompkins, group leader for broadcasting and online, The Poynter Institute.

    The guidelines were created though RTDNF’s Journalism Ethics Project sponsored by a generous grant from the Ethics and Excellence in Journalism.

    Read it on their site here: http://www.rtdna.org/pages/media_items/social-media-and-blogging-guidelines1915.php

     
  • clarehiler 3:24 pm on April 11, 2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , social media, Transparency   

    “Transparency will see us through”

    Jen Reeves talking about social media ethics (Follow her on twitter @jenleereeves)
     
  • clarehiler 7:17 pm on April 8, 2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , friday, social media   

    Why Users Are More Engaged With Social Media on Fridays

    /via Todd Wasserman http://mashable.com/2011/04/08/social-media-engagement-friday/

    Rebecca Black‘s not the only one who thinks there’s something special about Friday. Two separate pieces of research out this week show that the end of the work week is the best time to get traction on status updates and tweets.

    Analyzing more than 200 of its clients’ Facebook pages over a 14-day period, Buddy Media found that engagement on Thursdays and Fridays was 18% higher than the rest of the week, and that engagement was actually even better on Thursday than on Friday. Meanwhile, Twitter Chief Revenue Officer Adam Bain — speaking at the Ad Age Digital conference earlier this week — said that Twitter users are more engaged with tweets on Fridays.

    The reason is fairly obvious, says Jeremiah Owyang, a partner at the Altimeter Group: “People are heading into the weekend so they’re thinking about things besides work. They’re mentally checking out and transitioning to the weekend.”

    Rick Liebling, director of digital strategy at Coyne PR, concurs: “It’s a matter of people finally pushing past the work week and coasting toward the weekend, picking their head up a bit to see what’s going on and what their friends are up to.”

    However, Liebling adds that there might be another factor at work: There may be fewer posts overall on Fridays, which means a greater number of average click-throughs.

    Dan Zarrella, a social media scientist at HubSpot, agrees with that assessment. “I call it ‘contra-competitive timing,’” Zarrella says. “As the overall activity seems to slow down from the hustle and bustle of the week, readers can give each tweet more attention because there are fewer other tweets fighting for it.”

    Whatever the case, the fact that Thursdays and Fridays are the best days of the week for engagement isn’t yet common knowledge among marketers. As Buddy Media CEO Michael Lazerow also noted at the Ad Age Digital conference, most brands are similarly unaware that their status updates will get more pickup if they’re posted after work hours.

    But Owyang says that what’s generally true may not be applicable to many marketers, anyway. For instance, “Friday may not be the best time for the B2B audience because they’re checking out mentally.” Similarly, Lazerow said that for movie companies, the weekend is the sweet spot, but for other media companies, Monday is the worst day of the week. “It’s the noisiest time to post,” Lazerow said.

     
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